Call of Duty 16 : Modern Warfare

The one where the timer runs out every match because both teams refuse to move. dunk store

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  1. [Plot]

    Workaholic architect Adam Sandler gets a magical remote-control device that allows him to mute, rewind and fast-forward his life, with farcical and tragic results. It's "Back to the Future," "It's a Wonderful Life" and "Faust," with fart jokes. As a moral fable "Click" holds no surprises; as a Sandler comedy, it's unusually dark, occasionally touching and pretty funny. Kate Beckinsale plays his ignored wife, and Christopher Walken tosses weird comic curveballs as the otherworldly salesman from Bed Bath and Way Beyond. David Ansen

    [Gameplay]

    The emotionalism of Click will predictably get razzies from reviewers, who are busy circle-jerking Sympathy for Lady Vengeance. No danger of critical underrating here: Park Chan-wook's final entry in his "revenge trilogy" by now has spilled more than enough fan-boy ink to match the copious flow of blood that's been his trademark. Sure, the filmmaker's torch-bearers insist his violence is the tool chosen to explore the characters' churning furies, conveniently sidestepping Park's hollowness and his incoherence, the better to relish the whipped cream of sadistic titillation while supposedly getting a simultaneous fill of art-house cough-syrup. It takes a clever director to orchestrate such frenzied drooling, and throughout Lady Vengeance Park is nothing if not cunning in his string-pulling — it kicks off on a fastidiously facetious note, a batch of Santy Clauses serenading Lee Yeong-ae, the "angel" just released from prison, with gospel and a brick of tofu all but stamped with "Purity" on its side. No whiteness for her yet: After 13 years surrounded by cartoon dykes in jail, she is out for payback against the child-killer who's kidnapped her daughter and blackmailed her to take the rap for him. Cue harpsichord tinkling and Park's by-now excruciatingly familiar film-school bag o' tricks, wanton shifts in stock and angle, a gliding camera, compositional symmetry and scrambled narrative, the whole "darkness of the soul" fondue, poured heavily. And dreams, natch: the villain's head is glued to a dog's body, then shot apart.

    [Cons]

    Like many other Sandler movies, this one lingers studiously over bodily functions. After losing enormous amount of weight, for example, Michael plays with a big flap of loose skin around his stomach, plopping it up and down long after any possible audience curiosity has been satisfied. During an argument with his boss (David Hasselhoff), he freeze-frames the boss, jumps on his desk and farts. When he puts his boss back on "play," the boss inexplicably decides his secretary has put feces in his salad. Anyone who can't tell poop from lettuce doesn't deserve to be a senior partner. They teach you that in business school.

    [Pros]

    The movie does have some wit about its product placement. The plot is set in motion when Michael goes out late at night to buy a universal remote and only one store is open: Bed, Bath and Beyond. As a retail store name, this has always reminded me of the final subtitle in Kubrick's "2001," which was "Jupiter and Beyond the Infinite." Beyond the infinite. That's a fair piece. In the store Michael enters, Bed and Bath are easy to find, but Beyond is behind a mysterious door at the end of a very long corridor, where a man named Morty (Christopher Walken) makes him a gift of the universal remote. If they make "Click 2," I want it to be about Morty.

    [Conclusion]

    Overall, I would have to give this a 7/10. I really do think it has a little something for everyone.

  2. One of the many reasons that I won't touch CoD Modern Warfare is the fact that it deliberately distorts history to appease the Erdogan regime in Turkey and appeal to nationalist "Russiagaters" in America. As it says in an article from Kurdistan 24:

    "One of the main characters is inspired by female Kurdish commanders in Syria… As the story unfolds, Karim’s hometown is attacked by the Russian army with drones and nerve gas… In real life, the YPJ has mainly fought against the Islamic State and other Islamist rebel groups, NOT the Russian military."

    In real life, the Russians and Kurds are allies.

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